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Homegatewikicowtestunitgateyamresources 〉 yam-huge.html
 

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

1. A level 1 heading

1.1. A level 2 heading

1.1.1. A level 3 heading

2. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

3. Changes from version 3

3.1. Contents

3.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

3.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

3.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

3.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

3.2.2.1.0.0.1.
3.2.2.1.1.

3.2.3.

3.3. Horizontal lines

4. Lists

4.1. Verbatim output

4.2. Footnotes

4.3. Escapes

4.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

4.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

4.6. Links and anchors

4.7. A Heading

4.8. Block quotations

4.9. Line breaks

5. Tables

5.1. Images

5.2. Citations

5.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

5.4. A level 1 heading

5.4.1. A level 2 heading

5.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

5.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

6. YAM Syntax

6.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

6.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

6.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

6.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


6.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

6.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

6.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:1.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

6.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

6.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

6.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

6.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

6.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

6.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

6.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

6.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

6.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

2

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

7. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:3.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm4.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

8. lasdfkjlskdfj

8.1. sldfjsdlkfj

8.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

9. lksdjflksdjflkj

9.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

9.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

10. A level 1 heading

10.1. A level 2 heading

10.1.1. A level 3 heading

11. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

12. Changes from version 3

12.1. Contents

12.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

12.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

12.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

12.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

12.2.2.1.0.0.1.
12.2.2.1.1.

12.2.3.

12.3. Horizontal lines

13. Lists

13.1. Verbatim output

13.2. Footnotes

13.3. Escapes

13.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

13.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

13.6. Links and anchors

13.7. A Heading

13.8. Block quotations

13.9. Line breaks

14. Tables

14.1. Images

14.2. Citations

14.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

14.4. A level 1 heading

14.4.1. A level 2 heading

14.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

14.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

15. YAM Syntax

15.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

15.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

15.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

15.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


15.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

15.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

15.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:5.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

15.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

15.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

15.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

15.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

15.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

15.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

15.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

15.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

15.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

6

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

16. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:7.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm8.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

17. lasdfkjlskdfj

17.1. sldfjsdlkfj

17.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

18. lksdjflksdjflkj

18.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

18.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

19. A level 1 heading

19.1. A level 2 heading

19.1.1. A level 3 heading

20. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

21. Changes from version 3

21.1. Contents

21.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

21.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

21.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

21.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

21.2.2.1.0.0.1.
21.2.2.1.1.

21.2.3.

21.3. Horizontal lines

22. Lists

22.1. Verbatim output

22.2. Footnotes

22.3. Escapes

22.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

22.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

22.6. Links and anchors

22.7. A Heading

22.8. Block quotations

22.9. Line breaks

23. Tables

23.1. Images

23.2. Citations

23.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

23.4. A level 1 heading

23.4.1. A level 2 heading

23.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

23.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

24. YAM Syntax

24.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

24.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

24.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

24.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


24.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

24.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

24.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:9.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

24.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

24.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

24.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

24.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

24.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

24.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

24.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

24.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

24.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

10

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

25. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:11.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm12.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

26. lasdfkjlskdfj

26.1. sldfjsdlkfj

26.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

27. lksdjflksdjflkj

27.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

27.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

28. A level 1 heading

28.1. A level 2 heading

28.1.1. A level 3 heading

29. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

30. Changes from version 3

30.1. Contents

30.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

30.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

30.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

30.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

30.2.2.1.0.0.1.
30.2.2.1.1.

30.2.3.

30.3. Horizontal lines

31. Lists

31.1. Verbatim output

31.2. Footnotes

31.3. Escapes

31.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

31.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

31.6. Links and anchors

31.7. A Heading

31.8. Block quotations

31.9. Line breaks

32. Tables

32.1. Images

32.2. Citations

32.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

32.4. A level 1 heading

32.4.1. A level 2 heading

32.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

32.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

33. YAM Syntax

33.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

33.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

33.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

33.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


33.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

33.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

33.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:13.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

33.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

33.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

33.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

33.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

33.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

33.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

33.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

33.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

33.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

14

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

34. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:15.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm16.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

35. lasdfkjlskdfj

35.1. sldfjsdlkfj

35.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

36. lksdjflksdjflkj

36.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

36.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

37. A level 1 heading

37.1. A level 2 heading

37.1.1. A level 3 heading

38. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

39. Changes from version 3

39.1. Contents

39.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

39.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

39.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

39.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

39.2.2.1.0.0.1.
39.2.2.1.1.

39.2.3.

39.3. Horizontal lines

40. Lists

40.1. Verbatim output

40.2. Footnotes

40.3. Escapes

40.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

40.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

40.6. Links and anchors

40.7. A Heading

40.8. Block quotations

40.9. Line breaks

41. Tables

41.1. Images

41.2. Citations

41.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

41.4. A level 1 heading

41.4.1. A level 2 heading

41.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

41.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

42. YAM Syntax

42.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

42.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

42.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

42.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


42.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

42.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

42.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:17.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

42.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

42.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

42.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

42.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

42.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

42.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

42.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

42.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

42.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

18

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

43. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:19.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm20.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

44. lasdfkjlskdfj

44.1. sldfjsdlkfj

44.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

45. lksdjflksdjflkj

45.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

45.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

46. A level 1 heading

46.1. A level 2 heading

46.1.1. A level 3 heading

47. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

48. Changes from version 3

48.1. Contents

48.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

48.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

48.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

48.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

48.2.2.1.0.0.1.
48.2.2.1.1.

48.2.3.

48.3. Horizontal lines

49. Lists

49.1. Verbatim output

49.2. Footnotes

49.3. Escapes

49.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

49.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

49.6. Links and anchors

49.7. A Heading

49.8. Block quotations

49.9. Line breaks

50. Tables

50.1. Images

50.2. Citations

50.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

50.4. A level 1 heading

50.4.1. A level 2 heading

50.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

50.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

51. YAM Syntax

51.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

51.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

51.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

51.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


51.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

51.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

51.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:21.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

51.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

51.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

51.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

51.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

51.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

51.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

51.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

51.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

51.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

22

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

52. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:23.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm24.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

53. lasdfkjlskdfj

53.1. sldfjsdlkfj

53.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

54. lksdjflksdjflkj

54.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

54.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

55. A level 1 heading

55.1. A level 2 heading

55.1.1. A level 3 heading

56. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

57. Changes from version 3

57.1. Contents

57.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

57.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

57.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

57.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

57.2.2.1.0.0.1.
57.2.2.1.1.

57.2.3.

57.3. Horizontal lines

58. Lists

58.1. Verbatim output

58.2. Footnotes

58.3. Escapes

58.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

58.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

58.6. Links and anchors

58.7. A Heading

58.8. Block quotations

58.9. Line breaks

59. Tables

59.1. Images

59.2. Citations

59.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

59.4. A level 1 heading

59.4.1. A level 2 heading

59.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

59.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

60. YAM Syntax

60.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

60.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

60.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

60.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


60.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

60.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

60.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:25.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

60.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

60.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

60.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

60.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

60.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

60.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

60.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

60.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

60.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

26

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

61. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:27.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm28.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

62. lasdfkjlskdfj

62.1. sldfjsdlkfj

62.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

63. lksdjflksdjflkj

63.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

63.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

64. A level 1 heading

64.1. A level 2 heading

64.1.1. A level 3 heading

65. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

66. Changes from version 3

66.1. Contents

66.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

66.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

66.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

66.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

66.2.2.1.0.0.1.
66.2.2.1.1.

66.2.3.

66.3. Horizontal lines

67. Lists

67.1. Verbatim output

67.2. Footnotes

67.3. Escapes

67.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

67.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

67.6. Links and anchors

67.7. A Heading

67.8. Block quotations

67.9. Line breaks

68. Tables

68.1. Images

68.2. Citations

68.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

68.4. A level 1 heading

68.4.1. A level 2 heading

68.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

68.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

69. YAM Syntax

69.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

69.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

69.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

69.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


69.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

69.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

69.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:29.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

69.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

69.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

69.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

69.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

69.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

69.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

69.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

69.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

69.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

30

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

70. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:31.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm32.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

71. lasdfkjlskdfj

71.1. sldfjsdlkfj

71.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

72. lksdjflksdjflkj

72.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

72.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

73. A level 1 heading

73.1. A level 2 heading

73.1.1. A level 3 heading

74. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

75. Changes from version 3

75.1. Contents

75.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

75.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

75.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

75.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

75.2.2.1.0.0.1.
75.2.2.1.1.

75.2.3.

75.3. Horizontal lines

76. Lists

76.1. Verbatim output

76.2. Footnotes

76.3. Escapes

76.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

76.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

76.6. Links and anchors

76.7. A Heading

76.8. Block quotations

76.9. Line breaks

77. Tables

77.1. Images

77.2. Citations

77.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

77.4. A level 1 heading

77.4.1. A level 2 heading

77.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

77.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

78. YAM Syntax

78.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

78.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

78.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

78.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


78.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

78.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

78.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:33.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

78.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

78.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

78.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

78.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

78.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

78.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

78.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

78.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

78.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

34

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

79. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:35.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm36.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

80. lasdfkjlskdfj

80.1. sldfjsdlkfj

80.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

81. lksdjflksdjflkj

81.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

81.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

82. A level 1 heading

82.1. A level 2 heading

82.1.1. A level 3 heading

83. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

84. Changes from version 3

84.1. Contents

84.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

84.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

84.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

84.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

84.2.2.1.0.0.1.
84.2.2.1.1.

84.2.3.

84.3. Horizontal lines

85. Lists

85.1. Verbatim output

85.2. Footnotes

85.3. Escapes

85.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

85.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

85.6. Links and anchors

85.7. A Heading

85.8. Block quotations

85.9. Line breaks

86. Tables

86.1. Images

86.2. Citations

86.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

86.4. A level 1 heading

86.4.1. A level 2 heading

86.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

86.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

87. YAM Syntax

87.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

87.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

87.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

87.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


87.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

87.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

87.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:37.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

87.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

87.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

87.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

87.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

87.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

87.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

87.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

87.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

87.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

38

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

88. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:39.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm40.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

89. lasdfkjlskdfj

89.1. sldfjsdlkfj

89.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

90. lksdjflksdjflkj

90.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

90.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

91. A level 1 heading

91.1. A level 2 heading

91.1.1. A level 3 heading

92. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

93. Changes from version 3

93.1. Contents

93.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

93.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

93.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

93.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

93.2.2.1.0.0.1.
93.2.2.1.1.

93.2.3.

93.3. Horizontal lines

94. Lists

94.1. Verbatim output

94.2. Footnotes

94.3. Escapes

94.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

94.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

94.6. Links and anchors

94.7. A Heading

94.8. Block quotations

94.9. Line breaks

95. Tables

95.1. Images

95.2. Citations

95.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

95.4. A level 1 heading

95.4.1. A level 2 heading

95.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

95.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

96. YAM Syntax

96.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

96.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

96.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

96.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


96.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

96.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

96.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:41.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

96.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

96.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

96.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

96.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

96.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

96.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

96.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

96.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

96.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

42

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

97. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:43.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm44.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

98. lasdfkjlskdfj

98.1. sldfjsdlkfj

98.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

99. lksdjflksdjflkj

99.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

99.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

100. A level 1 heading

100.1. A level 2 heading

100.1.1. A level 3 heading

101. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

102. Changes from version 3

102.1. Contents

102.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

102.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

102.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

102.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

102.2.2.1.0.0.1.
102.2.2.1.1.

102.2.3.

102.3. Horizontal lines

103. Lists

103.1. Verbatim output

103.2. Footnotes

103.3. Escapes

103.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

103.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

103.6. Links and anchors

103.7. A Heading

103.8. Block quotations

103.9. Line breaks

104. Tables

104.1. Images

104.2. Citations

104.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

104.4. A level 1 heading

104.4.1. A level 2 heading

104.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

104.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

105. YAM Syntax

105.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

105.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

105.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

105.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


105.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

105.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

105.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:45.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

105.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

105.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

105.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

105.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

105.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

105.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

105.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

105.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

105.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

46

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

106. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:47.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm48.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

107. lasdfkjlskdfj

107.1. sldfjsdlkfj

107.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

108. lksdjflksdjflkj

108.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

108.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

109. A level 1 heading

109.1. A level 2 heading

109.1.1. A level 3 heading

110. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

111. Changes from version 3

111.1. Contents

111.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

111.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

111.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

111.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

111.2.2.1.0.0.1.
111.2.2.1.1.

111.2.3.

111.3. Horizontal lines

112. Lists

112.1. Verbatim output

112.2. Footnotes

112.3. Escapes

112.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

112.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

112.6. Links and anchors

112.7. A Heading

112.8. Block quotations

112.9. Line breaks

113. Tables

113.1. Images

113.2. Citations

113.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

113.4. A level 1 heading

113.4.1. A level 2 heading

113.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

113.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

114. YAM Syntax

114.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

114.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

114.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

114.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


114.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

114.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

114.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:49.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

114.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

114.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

114.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

114.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

114.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

114.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

114.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

114.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

114.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

50

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

115. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:51.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm52.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

116. lasdfkjlskdfj

116.1. sldfjsdlkfj

116.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

117. lksdjflksdjflkj

117.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

117.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

118. A level 1 heading

118.1. A level 2 heading

118.1.1. A level 3 heading

119. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

120. Changes from version 3

120.1. Contents

120.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

120.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

120.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

120.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

120.2.2.1.0.0.1.
120.2.2.1.1.

120.2.3.

120.3. Horizontal lines

121. Lists

121.1. Verbatim output

121.2. Footnotes

121.3. Escapes

121.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

121.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

121.6. Links and anchors

121.7. A Heading

121.8. Block quotations

121.9. Line breaks

122. Tables

122.1. Images

122.2. Citations

122.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

122.4. A level 1 heading

122.4.1. A level 2 heading

122.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

122.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

123. YAM Syntax

123.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

123.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

123.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

123.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


123.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

123.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

123.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:53.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

123.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

123.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

123.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

123.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

123.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

123.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

123.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

123.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

123.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

54

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

124. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:55.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm56.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

125. lasdfkjlskdfj

125.1. sldfjsdlkfj

125.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

126. lksdjflksdjflkj

126.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

126.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

127. A level 1 heading

127.1. A level 2 heading

127.1.1. A level 3 heading

128. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

129. Changes from version 3

129.1. Contents

129.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

129.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

129.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

129.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

129.2.2.1.0.0.1.
129.2.2.1.1.

129.2.3.

129.3. Horizontal lines

130. Lists

130.1. Verbatim output

130.2. Footnotes

130.3. Escapes

130.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

130.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

130.6. Links and anchors

130.7. A Heading

130.8. Block quotations

130.9. Line breaks

131. Tables

131.1. Images

131.2. Citations

131.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

131.4. A level 1 heading

131.4.1. A level 2 heading

131.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

131.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

132. YAM Syntax

132.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

132.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

132.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

132.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


132.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

132.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

132.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:57.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

132.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

132.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

132.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

132.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

132.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

132.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

132.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

132.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

132.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

58

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

133. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:59.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm60.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

134. lasdfkjlskdfj

134.1. sldfjsdlkfj

134.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

135. lksdjflksdjflkj

135.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

135.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

136. A level 1 heading

136.1. A level 2 heading

136.1.1. A level 3 heading

137. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

138. Changes from version 3

138.1. Contents

138.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

138.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

138.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

138.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

138.2.2.1.0.0.1.
138.2.2.1.1.

138.2.3.

138.3. Horizontal lines

139. Lists

139.1. Verbatim output

139.2. Footnotes

139.3. Escapes

139.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

139.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

139.6. Links and anchors

139.7. A Heading

139.8. Block quotations

139.9. Line breaks

140. Tables

140.1. Images

140.2. Citations

140.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

140.4. A level 1 heading

140.4.1. A level 2 heading

140.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

140.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

141. YAM Syntax

141.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

141.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

141.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

141.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


141.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

141.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

141.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:61.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

141.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

141.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

141.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

141.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

141.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

141.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

141.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

141.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

141.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

62

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

142. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:63.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm64.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

143. lasdfkjlskdfj

143.1. sldfjsdlkfj

143.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

144. lksdjflksdjflkj

144.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

144.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

145. A level 1 heading

145.1. A level 2 heading

145.1.1. A level 3 heading

146. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

147. Changes from version 3

147.1. Contents

147.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

147.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

147.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

147.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

147.2.2.1.0.0.1.
147.2.2.1.1.

147.2.3.

147.3. Horizontal lines

148. Lists

148.1. Verbatim output

148.2. Footnotes

148.3. Escapes

148.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

148.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

148.6. Links and anchors

148.7. A Heading

148.8. Block quotations

148.9. Line breaks

149. Tables

149.1. Images

149.2. Citations

149.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

149.4. A level 1 heading

149.4.1. A level 2 heading

149.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

149.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

150. YAM Syntax

150.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

150.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

150.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

150.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


150.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

150.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

150.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:65.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

150.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

150.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

150.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

150.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

150.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

150.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

150.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

150.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

150.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

66

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

151. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:67.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm68.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

152. lasdfkjlskdfj

152.1. sldfjsdlkfj

152.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

153. lksdjflksdjflkj

153.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

153.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

154. A level 1 heading

154.1. A level 2 heading

154.1.1. A level 3 heading

155. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

156. Changes from version 3

156.1. Contents

156.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

156.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

156.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

156.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

156.2.2.1.0.0.1.
156.2.2.1.1.

156.2.3.

156.3. Horizontal lines

157. Lists

157.1. Verbatim output

157.2. Footnotes

157.3. Escapes

157.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

157.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

157.6. Links and anchors

157.7. A Heading

157.8. Block quotations

157.9. Line breaks

158. Tables

158.1. Images

158.2. Citations

158.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

158.4. A level 1 heading

158.4.1. A level 2 heading

158.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

158.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

159. YAM Syntax

159.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

159.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

159.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

159.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


159.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

159.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

159.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:69.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

159.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

159.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

159.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

159.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

159.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

159.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

159.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

159.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

159.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

70

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

160. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:71.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm72.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

161. lasdfkjlskdfj

161.1. sldfjsdlkfj

161.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

162. lksdjflksdjflkj

162.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

162.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

163. A level 1 heading

163.1. A level 2 heading

163.1.1. A level 3 heading

164. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

165. Changes from version 3

165.1. Contents

165.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

165.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

165.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

165.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

165.2.2.1.0.0.1.
165.2.2.1.1.

165.2.3.

165.3. Horizontal lines

166. Lists

166.1. Verbatim output

166.2. Footnotes

166.3. Escapes

166.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

166.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

166.6. Links and anchors

166.7. A Heading

166.8. Block quotations

166.9. Line breaks

167. Tables

167.1. Images

167.2. Citations

167.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

167.4. A level 1 heading

167.4.1. A level 2 heading

167.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

167.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

168. YAM Syntax

168.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

168.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

168.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

168.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


168.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

168.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

168.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:73.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

168.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

168.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

168.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

168.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

168.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

168.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

168.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

168.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

168.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

74

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

169. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:75.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm76.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

170. lasdfkjlskdfj

170.1. sldfjsdlkfj

170.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

171. lksdjflksdjflkj

171.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

171.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

172. A level 1 heading

172.1. A level 2 heading

172.1.1. A level 3 heading

173. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

174. Changes from version 3

174.1. Contents

174.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

174.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

174.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

174.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

174.2.2.1.0.0.1.
174.2.2.1.1.

174.2.3.

174.3. Horizontal lines

175. Lists

175.1. Verbatim output

175.2. Footnotes

175.3. Escapes

175.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

175.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

175.6. Links and anchors

175.7. A Heading

175.8. Block quotations

175.9. Line breaks

176. Tables

176.1. Images

176.2. Citations

176.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

176.4. A level 1 heading

176.4.1. A level 2 heading

176.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

176.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

177. YAM Syntax

177.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

177.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

177.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

177.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


177.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

177.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

177.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:77.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

177.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

177.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

177.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

177.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

177.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

177.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

177.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

177.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

177.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

78

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

178. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:79.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm80.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

179. lasdfkjlskdfj

179.1. sldfjsdlkfj

179.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

180. lksdjflksdjflkj

180.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

180.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

181. A level 1 heading

181.1. A level 2 heading

181.1.1. A level 3 heading

182. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

183. Changes from version 3

183.1. Contents

183.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

183.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

183.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

183.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

183.2.2.1.0.0.1.
183.2.2.1.1.

183.2.3.

183.3. Horizontal lines

184. Lists

184.1. Verbatim output

184.2. Footnotes

184.3. Escapes

184.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

184.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

184.6. Links and anchors

184.7. A Heading

184.8. Block quotations

184.9. Line breaks

185. Tables

185.1. Images

185.2. Citations

185.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

185.4. A level 1 heading

185.4.1. A level 2 heading

185.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

185.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

186. YAM Syntax

186.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

186.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

186.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

186.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


186.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

186.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

186.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:81.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

186.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

186.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

186.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

186.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

186.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

186.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

186.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

186.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

186.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

82

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

187. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:83.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm84.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

188. lasdfkjlskdfj

188.1. sldfjsdlkfj

188.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

189. lksdjflksdjflkj

189.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

189.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

190. A level 1 heading

190.1. A level 2 heading

190.1.1. A level 3 heading

191. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

192. Changes from version 3

192.1. Contents

192.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

192.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

192.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

192.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

192.2.2.1.0.0.1.
192.2.2.1.1.

192.2.3.

192.3. Horizontal lines

193. Lists

193.1. Verbatim output

193.2. Footnotes

193.3. Escapes

193.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

193.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

193.6. Links and anchors

193.7. A Heading

193.8. Block quotations

193.9. Line breaks

194. Tables

194.1. Images

194.2. Citations

194.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

194.4. A level 1 heading

194.4.1. A level 2 heading

194.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

194.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

195. YAM Syntax

195.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

195.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

195.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

195.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


195.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

195.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

195.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:85.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

195.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

195.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

195.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

195.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

195.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

195.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

195.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

195.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

195.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

86

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

196. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:87.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm88.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

197. lasdfkjlskdfj

197.1. sldfjsdlkfj

197.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

198. lksdjflksdjflkj

198.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

198.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

199. A level 1 heading

199.1. A level 2 heading

199.1.1. A level 3 heading

200. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

201. Changes from version 3

201.1. Contents

201.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

201.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

201.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

201.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

201.2.2.1.0.0.1.
201.2.2.1.1.

201.2.3.

201.3. Horizontal lines

202. Lists

202.1. Verbatim output

202.2. Footnotes

202.3. Escapes

202.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

202.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

202.6. Links and anchors

202.7. A Heading

202.8. Block quotations

202.9. Line breaks

203. Tables

203.1. Images

203.2. Citations

203.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

203.4. A level 1 heading

203.4.1. A level 2 heading

203.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

203.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

204. YAM Syntax

204.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

204.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

204.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

204.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


204.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

204.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

204.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:89.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

204.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

204.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

204.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

204.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

204.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

204.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

204.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

204.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

204.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

90

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

205. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:91.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm92.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

206. lasdfkjlskdfj

206.1. sldfjsdlkfj

206.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

207. lksdjflksdjflkj

207.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

207.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

208. A level 1 heading

208.1. A level 2 heading

208.1.1. A level 3 heading

209. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

210. Changes from version 3

210.1. Contents

210.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

210.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

210.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

210.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

210.2.2.1.0.0.1.
210.2.2.1.1.

210.2.3.

210.3. Horizontal lines

211. Lists

211.1. Verbatim output

211.2. Footnotes

211.3. Escapes

211.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

211.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

211.6. Links and anchors

211.7. A Heading

211.8. Block quotations

211.9. Line breaks

212. Tables

212.1. Images

212.2. Citations

212.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

212.4. A level 1 heading

212.4.1. A level 2 heading

212.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

212.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

213. YAM Syntax

213.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

213.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

213.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

213.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


213.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

213.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

213.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:93.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

213.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

213.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

213.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

213.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

213.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

213.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

213.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

213.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

213.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

94

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

214. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:95.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm96.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

215. lasdfkjlskdfj

215.1. sldfjsdlkfj

215.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

216. lksdjflksdjflkj

216.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

216.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

217. A level 1 heading

217.1. A level 2 heading

217.1.1. A level 3 heading

218. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

219. Changes from version 3

219.1. Contents

219.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

219.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

219.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

219.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

219.2.2.1.0.0.1.
219.2.2.1.1.

219.2.3.

219.3. Horizontal lines

220. Lists

220.1. Verbatim output

220.2. Footnotes

220.3. Escapes

220.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

220.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

220.6. Links and anchors

220.7. A Heading

220.8. Block quotations

220.9. Line breaks

221. Tables

221.1. Images

221.2. Citations

221.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

221.4. A level 1 heading

221.4.1. A level 2 heading

221.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

221.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

222. YAM Syntax

222.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

222.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

222.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

222.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


222.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

222.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

222.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:97.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

222.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

222.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

222.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

222.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

222.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

222.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

222.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

222.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

222.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

98

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

223. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:99.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm100.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

224. lasdfkjlskdfj

224.1. sldfjsdlkfj

224.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

225. lksdjflksdjflkj

225.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

225.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

226. A level 1 heading

226.1. A level 2 heading

226.1.1. A level 3 heading

227. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

228. Changes from version 3

228.1. Contents

228.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

228.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

228.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

228.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

228.2.2.1.0.0.1.
228.2.2.1.1.

228.2.3.

228.3. Horizontal lines

229. Lists

229.1. Verbatim output

229.2. Footnotes

229.3. Escapes

229.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

229.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

229.6. Links and anchors

229.7. A Heading

229.8. Block quotations

229.9. Line breaks

230. Tables

230.1. Images

230.2. Citations

230.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

230.4. A level 1 heading

230.4.1. A level 2 heading

230.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

230.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

231. YAM Syntax

231.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

231.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

231.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

231.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


231.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

231.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

231.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:101.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

231.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

231.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

231.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

231.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

231.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

231.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

231.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

231.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

231.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

102

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

232. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:103.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm104.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

233. lasdfkjlskdfj

233.1. sldfjsdlkfj

233.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

234. lksdjflksdjflkj

234.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

234.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

235. A level 1 heading

235.1. A level 2 heading

235.1.1. A level 3 heading

236. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

237. Changes from version 3

237.1. Contents

237.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

237.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

237.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

237.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

237.2.2.1.0.0.1.
237.2.2.1.1.

237.2.3.

237.3. Horizontal lines

238. Lists

238.1. Verbatim output

238.2. Footnotes

238.3. Escapes

238.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

238.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

238.6. Links and anchors

238.7. A Heading

238.8. Block quotations

238.9. Line breaks

239. Tables

239.1. Images

239.2. Citations

239.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

239.4. A level 1 heading

239.4.1. A level 2 heading

239.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

239.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

240. YAM Syntax

240.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

240.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

240.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

240.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


240.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

240.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

240.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:105.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

240.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

240.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

240.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

240.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

240.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

240.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

240.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

240.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

240.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

106

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

This isa small table

but %[|This|isn't|%]

YAM URLs

Plain text URLs:

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp mailto:hamish@something.org

They have to be followed by space: this doesn't work: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp... so do this instead: ftp://antlr.org/home/someone/thing.jsp...

241. Miscellaneous previous URL examples

auto parsing all in-line links like http:, mailto:, ...

Footnote:107.

http://antlr.org/doc/lexer.html#unicode: includes the ":"

'http://gate.ac.uk/='

Hmmm108.

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

http://gate.ac.uk/sale/tao/index.html#234234234

thing

thing

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/='
  2. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/'

Old YAM URL processing (http://gate.ac.uk)

  1. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/)
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home)
  4. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home result 'http://gate.ac.uk/='). will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/ will become GATE home This is a Title***

242. lasdfkjlskdfj

242.1. sldfjsdlkfj

242.1.0.0.0.1. klsjdflksdjfl

243. lksdjflksdjflkj

243.1. Bold, italic, underline and teletype #bold

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold. Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic. Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype. Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.






Unordered lists are indicated by 'o' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by '-'. Nesting is indicated by two spaces preceding the item indicator. For example:

  1. ...ordered list -

For example:

               
This *will not* get translated               
      

The contents will be output to the translation file, but will be commented out in that file. \The quotation marks around the note are necessary; notes cannot contain quotation marks (even if escaped).

243.2. Links and anchors #links

Links can be specified in four ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/=' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using 'target', e.g. http://gate.ac.uk/ will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using 'label', e.g. GATE home will become GATE home
  4. Using Wiki syntax %ThisIsAWikiLink will become %ThisIsAWikiLink. Wiki links may also contain paths, specified with "/" relative to the current page.

Anchors and labels are specified using '#name'. For example,

                 
%2 A Heading #label                 

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example, becomes:

This is a quote

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example: becomes:   This line is broken   in two.

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example: results in: (|| ) | lkj

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2 ||
lkjflsdf
row 2 col 1 col 2

It is possible to have a

blockquote almost

-

anywhere!

Though it may not be a great idea...

Another block quote.

Blockquoate

This is a title.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines. YAM Heading Increments

244. A level 1 heading

244.1. A level 2 heading

244.1.1. A level 3 heading

245. A level 1 heading YAM Syntax

246. Changes from version 3

246.1. Contents

246.2. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

246.2.1. lkjfsldfkjsdf

246.2.2. lksjdflsdkjfl

246.2.2.1. slkdjfsd

246.2.2.1.0.0.1.
246.2.2.1.1.

246.2.3.

246.3. Horizontal lines

247. Lists

247.1. Verbatim output

247.2. Footnotes

247.3. Escapes

247.4. Headings Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

247.5. Headings

An unnumbered heading

An unnumbered heading

247.6. Links and anchors

247.7. A Heading

247.8. Block quotations

247.9. Line breaks

248. Tables

248.1. Images

248.2. Citations

248.3. Inclusion Images and other predicates

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, "ALT tag", 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

An include directive can reference more than one file, e.g.

%include(yam-first.yam, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

The first argument of an include directive can be an integer specifying an increment to add to the heading levels in the included file(s), e.g.:

%include(1, yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

248.4. A level 1 heading

248.4.1. A level 2 heading

248.4.1.1. A level 3 heading

248.5. A level 1 heading

Recursive includes are a bad idea:

%include(yam-includes.yam)

Will result in this file being included 1000 times (this is the include depth recursion limit). Some Lists

  1. a third list
  1. list 3/1
  2. 3/2
    • 3a/1
    • 3a/2
      1. 3aa/1
    • 3a/3
  3. 3/3

no longer have to be indented properly

list with two elements

list with one element

This is a three item list (after each - there is a space, which is necessary):

Empty elements can also nest...

This

Indentation

YAM minimal test file.

249. YAM Syntax

249.1. Changes from version 3

Slides: maybe:

249.2. Contents

Contents listings like that above are generated by '%contents'

249.3. Bold, italic, underline and teletype

Bold text is contained in stars: *this is bold* becomes this is bold.

Italic text is contained in underscores: _this is italic_ becomes this is italic.

Fixed-width text is contained in equals signs: =this is teletype= becomes this is teletype.

Underlined text is contained in doubles undercores: __this is underlined__ becomes this is underlined.

249.4. Horizontal lines

Horizontal lines are indicated by 3 or more - signs at the start of a line. For example:

---

and

---------------------------

both result in:


249.5. Lists

Unordered lists are indicated by '-' at the start of a line, and ordered lists by 'o'. Nesting is indicated by increased spacing preceding the item indicator. For example:

- This is an undordered list
- Second item
  # This is a nested...
  # ...ordered list
- Back to the third item of the enclosing list

results in:

249.6. Verbatim output

Verbatim output starts with '%<' and ends with '%>'. For example:

%< This will *not* get translated. %>

When the target language is HTML, for example, the output will contain '<pre>' tags.

249.7. Footnotes

Footnotes are like this:

%footnote(This is a footnote.)

Becomes:109.

The contents will be put in a section at the end of the document (HTML) or at the bottom of the page (LaTeX), and linked by number from where they occured.

249.8. Escapes

To stop a special character from being interpreted, use a '\'. For example,

 \--- 

will not generate a line.

249.9. Headings

Headings are lines starting with %1 (for first level), %2, %3 or %4. For example, the heading for this section is

%2 Headings

If a heading level is followed by "*" it is not numbered, e.g.:

%2* An unnumbered heading

Becomes:

An unnumbered heading

This heading will not appear in the contents table.

249.10. Links and anchors

Links can be specified in three ways:

  1. As plain text, e.g. 'http://gate.ac.uk/' will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  2. Using '%(target)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/) will become http://gate.ac.uk/
  3. Using '%(target, label)', e.g. %(http://gate.ac.uk/, GATE home) will become GATE home

Spaces or commas inside URLs must be escaped. A URL that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

Anchors and labels are specified using '%#name'. For example,

%2 A Heading %#label

will result in a heading followed by the anchor label.

Spaces or commas inside anchors must be escaped. An anchor that appears in plain text must be followed by a space, tab or newline.

249.11. Block quotations

Block quotations are enclosed in %" marks. For example,

  %"This is a quote%"

becomes:

This is a quote

249.12. Line breaks

Line breaks are indicated by %\ at the end of a line. For example:

This line is broken %\
in two.

becomes: % This line is broken % in two.

249.13. Tables

Tables use square brackets, bars and dashes. For example:

%[
 | *header col 1*	| *header col 2*        |
 ---
 | row 1 col 1	        | col 2                 |              
 ---
 | row 2 col 1	        | col 2                 |
%]

results in:

header col 1 header col 2
row 1 col 1 col 2
row 2 col 1 col 2

249.14. Images

Images are like URLs:

You can also specify an ALT tag, width and height, position and border width: '%image(test-image.png, ALT tag, 500, 500, left, 0)' becomes ALT tag

249.15. Citations

Citations work like this: '%cite(Cun06a)' becomes Cun06a. Multiple cite keys should be separated by commas, e.g.: '%cite(Cun05a,Cun06a)' becomes Cun05a, Cun06a.

249.16. Inclusion

A page can include another page like this:

%include(yam-first.yam)

Becomes:

This, by way of contrast, is a paragraph.

This is another paragraph. It contains two lines.

YAM Predicates

%unknown(1 2 3 ) %unknown(1 2 3 )

110

2

Cun94a Yam Scratch

x x

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of communism. All the powers of old Europe have entered into a holy alliance to exorcise this spectre: Pope and Tsar, Metternich and Guizot, French Radicals and German police-spies.

Where is the party in opposition that has not been decried as communistic by its opponents in power? Where is the opposition that has not hurled back the branding reproach of communism, against the more advanced opposition parties, as well as against its reactionary adversaries?

Two things result from this fact:

I. Communism is already acknowledged by all European powers to be itself a power.

II. It is high time that Communists should openly, in the face of the whole world, publish their views, their aims, their tendencies, and meet this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a manifesto of the party itself.

To this end, Communists of various nationalities have assembled in London and sketched the following manifesto, to be published in the English, French, German, Italian, Flemish and Danish languages.

In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against the existing social and political order of things.

In all these movements, they bring to the front, as the leading question in each, the property question, no matter what its degree of development at the time.

Finally, they labour everywhere for the union and agreement of the democratic parties of all countries.

The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win.

WORKING MEN OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE!

1

Some Tables

11 12 13
21 22 23
31 32 33
41 43
11 12
21
n11 n12
21b
22
1 2
3 4 5 67 8
9 10 11 12

x x

Book Introduction Conclusion
Author Title
Marx and Engels The Communist Manifesto

A spectre is haunting Europe - the spectre of c